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Protein Powder Reviews

By: Quest



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Protein > Whey Protein
ABOUT
Protein Powder is a Whey Protein Powder manufactured by Quest. It is a dairy based protein that supports lean muscle gain by suppling additional protein to recovering muscles, which can also improve fat loss.
PRODUCT RATING
7.6
(Out of 10, after 2 reviews)
2

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REVIEWS (2)



Overall
Overall
8.5
Effectiveness
Effectiveness
8.0
Value
Value
8.5
  March 14, 2018

 Pros:
 Cons:
  • Great Taste
  • Mixability Of Cookies And Cream Flavour
Hello SR community. Today I will be submitting a review for Quest Protein Powder, a product I had been very keen to try for a number of years but has either been unobtainable or ridiculously expensive which has kept me from giving it a go. Everyone knows Quest protein bars are the benchmark in protein bars in terms of taste, and I'm partial to a whole box of cookies and cream if I don't stop myself. So how would the protein powder stack up? Let's find out.

QUICK BACK STORY

Quest protein bars retail for around $4 a pop here in Australia. That's expensive. If it's a good deal you can sometimes get a box of 12 for $33-35, which brings down the price a bit, but still expensive compared to the states. When Quest Protein Powder is available in Australia, it's $60-70 for a 2lb tub. That's proper expensive. I had a trip to Hawaii last year for a wedding so naturally stocked up on reasonably priced supplements like I normally do when I visit the states. This time we took our 3 month old son, including his pusher in a heavy-duty case, which gave me plenty of space to stash protein containers in on the way back, which I fully took advantage of, hence being in a position to pick up Quest protein powder.

INGREDIENT PROFILE - 8/10

This is not your super-lean protein powder, let's be clear about that straight up. But it doesn't claim to be. 7g of carbs per 28g serving is on the high side, and 1.5g of fat is on the low end. This is for the Cookies and Cream, which is the flavour I bought. Some of the other flavours have as low as 3g of carbs, which is a much leaner option. You have to remember though that Quest products usually taste magnificent, and while there is some black magic involved they aren't able to do the impossible and make a great tasting product without any drawbacks.yet.

TASTE - 10/10

Yup, right on the money from Quest, as long as you dose it properly. It tastes like you expect it to, and just like the protein bars it's a magical oreos taste you crave more of. Of course I cant comment on the other flavours, but if they are like any other Quest product they will taste amazing.

MIXABILITY - 6/10

The problem when you put chunks of chocolate or whatever it is into a protein powder, is that it's going to want to settle. When you mix that up in water and the protein powder fractions dissolve, you get the leftover choc bits that settle out even quicker. It's not ideal, and means you need to continually swirl the shaker, and even then you end up with choc chunks in the bottom when you're done. To be fair, Quest market this product as being great for baking as well as shakes, and for that purpose mixability is a bit of a moot point because you're making brownies or a loaf or pancakes or whatever. But as for mixing as a protein drink, it's not great. I would imagine other flavours like vanilla and chocolate and anything without chunks in it would mix up really well.

DOSING

I found the dosing of Quest protein powder to be quite difficult to get right. Due to the high level of casein protein (I assume) there was a fine line between adding too little water and it frothing up and being too thick to drink, and adding too much water and getting it going really watery and dilute, making it unpleasant to drink. This seems to be common with a lot of casein proteins, although I found Quest protein powder to have a finer range to play with than other products. I did dose Quest protein powder 1 scoop with 1 scoop of bulk vanilla WPI at times. This gave me a really nice tasting product, and obviously made the tub go longer, allowing me to enjoy the great taste for longer.

EFFECTIVENESS - 8/10

Effectiveness of a protein powder is difficult to judge. A lot of the time it's more if a protein powder product affects you negatively more than positively, as the changes between 1 and another can be quite subtle. For me, as long as my soreness does not increase and I don't have any negative sides like gas or bloating etc, then it's doing its job of helping me get my amount of protein in per day. Quest protein powder did not negatively affect me in any way, aside from always leaving choc chunks in the bottom of my shaker cup that I really wanted to get out and eat because they tasted some damn good. My recovery and soreness did not noticeably change one way or another whilst taking this product. My weight and body composition also remained similar, indicating to me the protein powder was as effective as any other quality protein powder on the market.

SIDE EFFECTS - 10/10

Nothing to report here. No gas, bloating or other ill-effects whilst taking this product.

VALUE - 8.5/10

You can get a 2lb tub of this stuff for as low as $24.99 which will get you 8lb for $100, or thereabouts. I don't consider that to be outstanding value, however it's a fair price I think for this quality of a product. A lot of the time it's more expensive than this, which diminishes the value. If you can get this on a BOGO I would definitely pick it up. I would recommend other flavours to the cookies and cream though, as much as I love the cookies and cream protein bars, there are better options in my opinion when it comes to the powder versions.

CONCLUSION - 8.5/10

Quest protein powder has that amazingly great taste Quest products are known for, with a decent enough profile (as long as you aren't on a cut and super-conscious about your carb intake) at a price that is comparable to other products in the market. As for the flavour I tried (cookies & cream) I found that the choc chunks that remained in your shaker, and the higher carb content of this flavour mean that I wouldn't buy this flavour again, but I would certainly look at other flavours in the future. Would I buy this product again with my own money? If I could find it on a good deal or a BOGO, and I could pick a different flavour, then I would absolutely consider this. Would I recommend this product to others? Regardless of if you've tried a Quest protein bar or powder before, I would recommend everyone tries a Quest protein powder, at least once. I'm yet to find a consistently better tasting powder out there. Thanks for reading guys.
Flavors:
  • Cookies & Cream: 10/10



Overall
Overall
8.0
Effectiveness
Effectiveness
9.0
Value
Value
8.0
  December 3, 2014

 Pros:
 Cons:
  • Digests Well
  • Great Taste
  • Slightly Higher Price Than Competitors
Quest Protein Powder – As good as the bars?

Greetings, fellow SR members! As both a long-time 'guest' lurker on SR.com and an avid supplement user, I have found this site to be a great resource for cutting through the hype provided by manufacturers and advertisements, and discovering what people really think of these products. We all want to know (or at least think and hope!) that our money is going toward quality, effective products. As such, it’s nice to now be part of a community that helps decipher the good from the bad. So, that said, I have finally decided to break the ice with my first product review:

Quest Protein Powder - Peanut Butter flavor.

Quest is likely best known by most folks for their protein bars, which are quite tasty and have a pretty good nutrient profile (I like the high fiber content). I’ve also come to enjoy their chips and peanut butter cups, and was excited to see them release a protein powder.

Presentation/Label (8/10):
Quest’s protein powder is packaged in a white tub which is a little taller and skinnier than many other 2 lb. containers. I found the size to be a plus when considering where to store it among the other dozen-or-so protein powders in my pantry and closet. The label is clear and easy to read with all the standard nutrition information, serving suggestions, as well as a few cooking/recipe ideas. As an aside, it also came with a recipe booklet. I generally don’t experiment much with baking/cooking with protein powders, however, I will say that some of their recipes look delicious.

One stand out feature of their label that I really like is that they provide the percentage breakdown for each type of protein contained in the blend. In the ‘Ingredients’ section, most companies might list a blended protein such as: whey protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, calcium caseinate, hydrolyzed whey protein, or some such combination of protein types. Quest provides that basic info, but also provides the percentage numbers in large font on the left side, which I’ll detail in the next section. In an industry where it’s sometimes difficult to know exactly what’s in a product, Quest’s labeling helps provide a little transparency which I appreciate, especially as we consumers become more knowledgeable and scrutinizing of our supplements and the companies that make them. The one thing I’d like to see on this label, and frankly on any protein powder label, is the breakdown on amino acids per serving, but that’s a minor gripe.

Ingredient Profile (9/10):
As noted above, Quest’s protein powder is a blend. The peanut butter flavor in particular is a blend of whey isolate, micellar casein, and milk protein isolate. The percentage of each per the label is: 50% whey isolate, 40% micellar casein, 10% milk protein isolate. *Depending on flavor the exact blend varies; Vanilla and Unflavored are 60% whey isolate, 40% micellar casein, with Chocolate and Strawberries & Cream using the same 50/40/10 blend as peanut butter.
One serving contains:
Calories: 110
Fat: 1 gram
Carb: 2 grams, (1 gram fiber and <1 gram sugar)
Protein: 23 grams
Cholesterol: 15 mg

Considering this particular blend of proteins along with the lower calorie amount and macro breakdown, this is a very solid ingredient/nutritional profile. A few similar blends I’ve used and liked are USP Labs OxyElite Protein, PES Select, Trutein, and Jim Stoppani’s Pro JYM, and I think Quest’s powder/profile fits nicely among such competitors.

Mixability (7/10):
Being a blend that contains 40% micellar casein, I expected this to produce a thicker shake when using the recommended 8 oz. of liquid, which was correct. Using a Blender Bottle (no whisk) and shaking for ~15-20 seconds gave me a very smooth, moderately thick shake with no chunks or grittiness leftover. Certainly the why isolate in this blend helps with ease of mixability. I’d compare it to Cellucor COR Performance whey (using label recommendations for powder/liquid) on consistency, and prefer to use 10 oz. water instead of 8, as I like shakes on the thinner side.

Taste (9/10):
This was the aspect I was most anticipating, and had wondered if the taste would be as good as I’ve come to expect from Quest’s bars and PB cups. I wasn’t disappointed; taste was excellent and of all the peanut butter flavored proteins I’ve tried, Quest is a new favorite, with Metabolic Nutrition’s Protizyme PB flavor a close second. It’s a more natural/real tasting peanut butter flavor compared to others, and I haven’t noticed any odd aftertaste. I imagine it would be very tasty in a variety of things like cookies, pancakes, ice cream, etc.

Effectiveness (N/A):
As many note when it comes to protein powder reviews, it’s difficult to rate effectiveness, so I’ll use this section to briefly touch on digestion and satiation after taking a serving. I’ve used this between meals, first thing in the morning and before bed, and would say it does a good job of keeping hunger at bay, while giving me no gut/G.I issues thus far.

Value (7/10):
I purchased this from my local gym for $37.99. The 2 lb. container provides 30 servings, working out to roughly $1.26/serving. From what I can find, it doesn’t appear many online retailers are carrying this yet, though both Vitamin Shoppe and GNC list it at $37.99 (that’s the GNC member price), with it being available for $39.99 directly from Quest. While the overall purchase price is a little higher than the other powders I mentioned above, the price per serving is quite close (within $0.10 - 0.20).

Overall rating (8/10):
If you’re in the market for a high-quality protein blend that tastes great and provides decent per-serving value, I’d highly recommend Quest Protein Powder. I will certainly purchase this again and look forward to trying both the chocolate and vanilla. As time goes on I’ll be curious to see where pricing ends up as more retailers pick it up, as well as what other flavors Quest comes up with.



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