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SupplementPolice.com is Corrupt


May 30, 2017 // In Supplement Scams // By

“What a great domain name” I thought to myself when I first noticed SupplementPolice.com a while back.  At first I didn’t think much of it, but then over the years as I started seeing this site rank higher and higher in Google, I figured it was time to check them out.

 

SupplementPolice.com claims “To Serve & Protect Natural Health Supplements”

 

They are trying to sell themselves as some sort of purveyor of honest information in the supplement industry, but on closer inspection, they are writing terrible content, buying links and attempting to game the Google algorithm so they can cash in on commission by getting you to click on ads and buy scammy products.

 

There’s a lot to cover here, so let’s dive into it.

 

Their content is written for search engines by cheap writers, not by humans who have used or experienced the products.

 

I started off by trying to read their Review on Pre JYM.  It’s roughly 1,000 words long and contains variations of the phrase “Pre Jym” about 20 times.  Clearly optimized for Google.

 

Let’s read the 1st paragraph of their Pre Jym review:

 

 

What?  Are you kidding me?  This is saying absolutely nothing.  The rest of the article reads almost the same way.  Basically a lot of words but absolutely no meaning at all.  Here’s a gem about the price:

 

 

Um, what?!?  Pre Jym is sold for $35 for 20 servings.  What other brands are sold for double, ~$70 or “tripe” (I think they mean triple), ~$105 for 20 servings of Pre-Workout?

 

Edit: I noticed that their “Buy Now” link is for $70.95 for 20 servings on Amazon.  Oh, and it’s also $28.84 shipping. So nearly $100 for 20 servings, and they are still saying that other brands are double or [triple] that…

 

 

Anyone who is actually reading this review will immediately see that the content on SupplementPolice.com is not written by knowledgeable and experienced supplement users who have used the product, but instead by cheap writers who have no idea what they are talking about.

 

Since SupplementPolice.com has zero transparency, they do not show which writer produced this content, or whether or not different writers produce different content.  Either way, this review is in no way helpful to the potential customer, and nothing more than a complete waste of time to anyone reading it.  But then again, their target audience is search engines, not humans.

 

SupplementPolice.com is pushing known scam supplements.

 

So at the bottom of the Pre Jym review, there’s a huge red button labeled “Click Here To See The Best Muscle Boosting Supplement”.  I went ahead and clicked on it to see what SupplementPolice.com considered to be the “Best Muscle Boosting Supplement”.

 

 

And where did it take me?  Directly to the Nugenix order page, of course!

 

 

Are you kidding me?  We went in-depth to show that Nugenix is a scam, yet SupplementPolice.com is calling it “The Best Muscle Boosting Supplement”.  They don’t even link to their review, they just take you directly to the “Claim your sample” page.  Oh, and by the way, when you sign up to get your “sample”, you’ll be billed nearly $75 every month for their autoship program.

 

This is hardly a product that someone out to “Protect & Serve” would recommend to their readers.

 

SupplementPolice.com spams their link on fake blogs on expired domains to game search engines.

 

Over the last 6 months or so, I noticed SupplementPolice.com was coming up time and time again when I was searching for info on various supplements.  I wanted to dig a little deeper, so I checked them out on some tools like SEMRush and AHrefs.  

 

 

The top chart is from AHrefs.com - it shows the backlinks to SupplementPolice.com over the last year.  The bottom graph is from SEMRush.com.  It shows their estimated Google traffic over the last year.

 

So in the last 2 months of 2016, SupplementPolice.com earned a TON of backlinks, which clearly resulted in a boom in Google traffic.  Perhaps they had a post go viral?

 

Thankfully, Ahrefs.com allows me to look at the backlinks created over that time.  Not surprisingly, the vast majority are highly unnatural links that were paid for.   While these are a direct violation of the Google Webmaster Guidelines, it can take months or years for Google to discover and penalize a site like this.

 

All of the links follow almost an identical pattern:

 

  • Wordpress blog consisting of no more than 10 posts

  • The most recent post (and the one featured on the homepage) is a poorly written post about supplements and links to SupplementPolice.com

  • On a domain that used to be something completely different a few years ago (can confirm with the WayBackMachine)

  • Domain is completely unrelated to supplements.

  • Social media icons that don’t actually point to their social accounts

  • Fake contact information or “Join now” buttons to make the site appear legit.

 

Let’s be honest here - these are spam links coming from fake sites, and just like the content on SupplementPolice.com, is intended to fool search engines into giving them more traffic so they can make money by selling you bullshit.

 

PS: Here’s the list of domains where you’ll find a link to SupplementPolice.com somewhere on the homepage - this is sometimes referred to as a PBN or Private Blog Network.

 

  • artonpaper.com

  • way2miracle.com

  • officialdavidallancoe.com

  • sweetbetweens.com

  • martincountyfla.com

  • yacht-haven-phuket.com

  • beastsound.net

  • acisweb.com

  • caica.org

  • simpsonwood.org

  • 400words.com

  • airissweet.com

  • sw-mins.org

  • aframedigital.com

  • 2bme.org

  • incommons.org

  • uticaaud.org

  • openstudents.org

  • uroradiology.org

  • subscription-agents.org

  • nofreelunch-uk.org

  • cenerx.com

  • homeenergychallenge.org

  • skybluewaters.org

  • nbnlmedicalcenter.com

  • bigmarijuanabigmistake.org

  • argyll.org

  • farandfaraway.com

  • ofibc.org

  • marligen.com

  • artquiltersouth.org

  • doctrinalauditing.org

  • montcogop.org

  • thevoicereport.com

  • plasmaenvironmental.com

  • chartersbyeclipse.com

  • addedvalue.net

  • caissny.org

  • jeffersoncc.org

  • smokefreecoalition.org

  • jacobperry.us

  • above-ground-ladders-pool.info

  • maea.org

  • ownyourfailure.com

  • dontmesswithmypet.org

  • actionsf.org

  • middleparkmeatco.com

  • strangemoonart.com


COMMENTS (4)


  • mhseaver670
    Rep: +6,692
    May 30, 2017

    damn! 100 bucks for 20 servings. lol



  • kaka
    Rep: +919
    May 31, 2017

    Just a "small" extra cost bro :). They need the money for "educational" purposes and they "care" about you. Their name is Supplement Police so it must be true.



  • bzyczek
    Rep: +1,736
    June 1, 2017

    What happened to hard work and earning your money?



  • June 9, 2017

    SupplementPolice.com has 2 of our products listed as #1 in their category on a blog post, and we have never communicated with anyone from the site. We may ask them to take it down, if it becomes known as a dishonest place to get supplement advice. Thanks for the incite!




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