Topic: Tribulus terrestris vs tribulus aquaticus  (Read 13031 times)

Offline SteveOstack

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Tribulus terrestris vs tribulus aquaticus
« on: July 08, 2010, 06:56:08 AM »
I know what terrestris works on, but what is aquaticus's mode of action? Does it activate LH in the same way as regular trib? Or does it have a different route all together?
 

Offline Emery

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Re: Tribulus terrestris vs tribulus aquaticus
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2010, 10:18:26 AM »
Neither work(Tribulus terrestris/Tribulus aquaticus) according to legitimate studies, there is however a form that shows promise, check out the study below...

Not Tribulus terrestris, but Tribulus alatus

Tribulus alatus is a plant that grows in the Sahara and Middle East. It is a relative of Tribulus terrestris, well known in the sports world in the form of supplements which manufacturers claim raise testosterone levels. Recent studies have put paid to these claims, but according to Egyptian researchers, T. alatus is a different kettle of fish.

The Egyptians did tests on male rats. The animals were given extracts of Tribulus alatus through a tube into the stomach every day for a period of forty days. Afterwards the researchers measured the amount of free testosterone in the rats’ blood.

The most interesting measurements are shaded in the table.

Treatment
 Concentration of free testosterone, pg per mm
 
2.5 milliters of water per kilo bodyweight per day
 0.75
 
50 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / 70% alcoholic extract from plant minus roots and fruits
 2.96
 
50 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / 70% alcoholic extract from whole plant
 3.9
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / chloroform extract from the plant minus roots and fruits
 3.88
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / ethyl acetate extract from the plant minus roots and fruits
 5.7
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / butanol extract from the plant minus roots and fruits
 2.93
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / ethanol extract from the plant minus roots and fruits
 3.38
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / chloroform extract from fruits
 21.3
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / ethyl acetate extract from fruits
 8
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / butanol extract from fruits
 8.81
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / ethanol extract from fruits
 18.75
 
It looks as though T. alatus contains substances that have a pharmacological effect. It might be worth tracing these and perhaps even synthesising them. The researchers suspect that they are dealing with steroid compounds. They base . this idea on the literature. During the Communist era, Russian researchers published a lot on the anabolic effects of plant materials such as deltoside and protodioscin. On the basis of these studies, manufacturers brought Tribulus terrestris supplements on to the market, backed by claims that the plant raises testosterones levels.

Athletes who have failed drugs tests sometimes cite T. terrestris as an excuse. Because sports scientists have started to examine the extent to which athletes tell the truth, a lot of research has been published recently on the hormonal effect of T. terrestris. A Bulgarian study found that T. terrestris had no effect on the manufacture of LH, androstenedione or testosterone. Researchers in Lausanne reported similar results. The Tribulus excuse no longer holds water.

Recent studies have not been able to show any improvement in performance as a result of T. terrestris. American researchers reported already eight years ago that if weight trainers are given the supplement, they do not get stronger or gain more muscle mass. Australian researchers who tested T. terrestris on rugby players also found no positive effects on body composition or strength.

But still. Maybe T. alatus does work. According to Ergo-log’s sources, Asian companies have been buying up batches of T. alatus in recent months. Maybe it won’t be too long before we see T. alatus supplements for sale online.

By the way, T. terrestris does have a prosexual effect: it even increases sex drive in castrated rats.


Sources:
Int Braz J Urol. 2007 Jul-Aug; 33(4):554-8.


whether you think you can or whether you think you can't, you're right! ~Henry Ford~
 

Offline matt77h

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Re: Tribulus terrestris vs tribulus aquaticus
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2010, 10:24:08 AM »
Neither work(Tribulus terrestris/Tribulus aquaticus) according to legitimate studies, there is however a form that shows promise, check out the study below...

Not Tribulus terrestris, but Tribulus alatus

Tribulus alatus is a plant that grows in the Sahara and Middle East. It is a relative of Tribulus terrestris, well known in the sports world in the form of supplements which manufacturers claim raise testosterone levels. Recent studies have put paid to these claims, but according to Egyptian researchers, T. alatus is a different kettle of fish.

The Egyptians did tests on male rats. The animals were given extracts of Tribulus alatus through a tube into the stomach every day for a period of forty days. Afterwards the researchers measured the amount of free testosterone in the rats’ blood.

The most interesting measurements are shaded in the table.

Treatment
 Concentration of free testosterone, pg per mm
 
2.5 milliters of water per kilo bodyweight per day
 0.75
 
50 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / 70% alcoholic extract from plant minus roots and fruits
 2.96
 
50 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / 70% alcoholic extract from whole plant
 3.9
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / chloroform extract from the plant minus roots and fruits
 3.88
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / ethyl acetate extract from the plant minus roots and fruits
 5.7
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / butanol extract from the plant minus roots and fruits
 2.93
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / ethanol extract from the plant minus roots and fruits
 3.38
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / chloroform extract from fruits
 21.3
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / ethyl acetate extract from fruits
 8
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / butanol extract from fruits
 8.81
 
12.5 milligrams per kilo bodyweight per day / ethanol extract from fruits
 18.75
 
It looks as though T. alatus contains substances that have a pharmacological effect. It might be worth tracing these and perhaps even synthesising them. The researchers suspect that they are dealing with steroid compounds. They base . this idea on the literature. During the Communist era, Russian researchers published a lot on the anabolic effects of plant materials such as deltoside and protodioscin. On the basis of these studies, manufacturers brought Tribulus terrestris supplements on to the market, backed by claims that the plant raises testosterones levels.

Athletes who have failed drugs tests sometimes cite T. terrestris as an excuse. Because sports scientists have started to examine the extent to which athletes tell the truth, a lot of research has been published recently on the hormonal effect of T. terrestris. A Bulgarian study found that T. terrestris had no effect on the manufacture of LH, androstenedione or testosterone. Researchers in Lausanne reported similar results. The Tribulus excuse no longer holds water.

Recent studies have not been able to show any improvement in performance as a result of T. terrestris. American researchers reported already eight years ago that if weight trainers are given the supplement, they do not get stronger or gain more muscle mass. Australian researchers who tested T. terrestris on rugby players also found no positive effects on body composition or strength.

But still. Maybe T. alatus does work. According to Ergo-log’s sources, Asian companies have been buying up batches of T. alatus in recent months. Maybe it won’t be too long before we see T. alatus supplements for sale online.

By the way, T. terrestris does have a prosexual effect: it even increases sex drive in castrated rats.


Sources:
Int Braz J Urol. 2007 Jul-Aug; 33(4):554-8.




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Offline Emery

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Re: Tribulus terrestris vs tribulus aquaticus
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2010, 10:32:30 AM »
www.ergo-log.com

Has some really good data compiled there. I try not to copy and paste too much but...

I hate seeing my bros waste money on Tribulus. It is bunk IMHO!!!
whether you think you can or whether you think you can't, you're right! ~Henry Ford~
 

Offline matt77h

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Re: Tribulus terrestris vs tribulus aquaticus
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2010, 12:04:30 PM »
www.ergo-log.com

Has some really good data compiled there. I try not to copy and paste too much but...

I hate seeing my bros waste money on Tribulus. It is bunk IMHO!!!

Thanks for the info. I already bought a cycle of Animal Stak and SciFit T-max and don't wanna throw it out lol Guess I'm going to see how things work. If you think there junk though how about Garlick loving the TZ3 stack? I'm just curious since you two have opposing views it looks like and I take what you both have to say whole heartedly.
The Chicago BLACKHAWKS are your 2009-10 Central Division, Western Conference & Stanley Cup Champions!

The BLACKHAWKS Snack on Danger & Dine on Death!

How am I the only Motocrosser? Lame-o

Train like Bruce Lee

Neg rep me F@ggot$!
 

Offline Emery

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Re: Tribulus terrestris vs tribulus aquaticus
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2010, 12:30:57 PM »
Well...

Without sounding like I am back peddaling...

I have never had luck with tribulus supplements. In the 90s, no luck... Years later, still no luck.

I just don't feel like it is a worthwhile product. I think a good diet with simple supplementation mixed with consistency is the most basic and fundamentally the best way to go at it.

I am interested in Pink Magic. Give it a run, maybe it will work for you.
whether you think you can or whether you think you can't, you're right! ~Henry Ford~
 

Offline sturmie

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Re: Tribulus terrestris vs tribulus aquaticus
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2010, 01:09:58 PM »
www.ergo-log.com

Has some really good data compiled there. I try not to copy and paste too much but...

I hate seeing my bros waste money on Tribulus. It is bunk IMHO!!!

Didnt we already go over all this a week ago?
 

Offline Emery

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Re: Tribulus terrestris vs tribulus aquaticus
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2010, 03:35:33 PM »
www.ergo-log.com

Has some really good data compiled there. I try not to copy and paste too much but...

I hate seeing my bros waste money on Tribulus. It is bunk IMHO!!!

Didnt we already go over all this a week ago?

Probably...
whether you think you can or whether you think you can't, you're right! ~Henry Ford~